Let's meet... James Brown, Printmaker

Posted: Jul 27 2015


 

We have a chat with printmaker, James Brown, based in Hackney Wick we have been stocking James' prints almost since day one. James specialises in information based graphic screenprints, which we stock a selection of both online, and in store. Take a look at James' work here.

 

Tell us a bit about yourself and your background

I trained as a textile designer and working in the clothing industry for many years before jacking it all in in 2007 when I decided to become an illustrator. I started making screen prints as a bit of a hobby and tentatively started showing them on a very local level, in local cafes and at my son’s school arts ‘n’ crafts fair. It was a very organic evolution and I never set out to make a living out of selling prints.

 

What’s the ‘philosophy’ behind the product?

I started making prints for my own amusement and enjoyment that is still the case today.

 

Where do you find inspiration?

All over the place. Being nosey and inquisitive helps. Collecting and searching for ‘stuff’ and old books are a constant source of inspiration, visually and for content.

 

Where are your products made?

All my printing is done by me in my studio in Hackney Wick, London.

 

What is your studio like?

My studio, like my practice, has grown organically so I haven’t really spent any money on flashy printing kit, it’s all quite lo-fi but it works for me. I have a good amount of space so have the luxury of being able to hoard a load of stuff that I don’t need ’but might make use of one day’. I really do need a bit of a sort out.

 

Describe a day in the life of you…

My cycle to work through the Olympic park is brilliant, I live on one side and work on the other so hardly have to use roads, it’s an entire journey of cycle paths, river and canal paths and green space. A good start to the day. When I get to my studio it’s usually a day of printing, packing wholesale and online orders, visits to the Post Office, paper work, replying to emails or ordering supplies. All this keeps me very busy and tends to fill my days without leaving me the time to sit down and be creative. Actually sitting down to design is a luxury and something that I tend to do in my home office where I feel I can concentrate better and where I am more inspired because I have lots of lovely reference books to thumb through and a lovely garden to stare out of the window at.